Tag Archives: free

3 Places you can Visit for Free near Fremantle with Kids

The situation:  It’s the first day of 2018, and my budget for travel is at zero dollars.  However, I would love to take a little road trip with the kids without it costing me money I don’t have!  Where do I go?

Leighton Battery Heritage Site – WWII Tunnels

This is the home to the World War II Tunnels which are only open on Sundays.  However, the park  is open for viewing on all days and entrance is free. Perfect Budget Saver!!

Another location for one of the War Guns Used to protect the coast

The walk to the Tunnels is on an incline.  My kids (now teens) did not mind and seemed to sprint to the top of the hill before I did.

Just near the summit of the hill are two anti-aircraft guns.  All moving parts are sealed for public protection, however it offers a real sense of what it was like back in the 40’s.

While the kids were walking around taking photos of the view, I spent the time contemplating how hard it would have been for Wartime Veterans to man this stations, especially in Perth’s Summer heat.  I could feel the heat and I had only just arrived!

Looking down the barrel of the Big Canon AKA

Just around the back end of the guns is the entrance to the tunnels.  While they were locked up, one can have an outside-in view from just outside the gate.  I felt a cool air come from the tunnels, and wondered if they offered the same coolness during the World War II era.

World War II Tunnel Leighton

At the base of the Anti-aircraft Guns is another huge Canon.  It is the home to the 6 inch BK XI Gun Shield.  Notably, the shield took some beating from years of weather abuse, which were restored to its current condition.

Welcome to the Tunnels – one of the entrances to the tunnel

At this point, one of the kids stated that she had been down most of the roads and did not see anything else.  The feedback at this point was that she was tired and wanting to return to the car.  However, just behind a tree was a circular construction that was begging for a little investigation.

I had wondered where the Tunnels lead to, and I found that there was a range of tunnels leading to different areas of the base.  I found another tunnel entrance at the base of the canon just adjacent to a huge circular structure.

Leighton Battery Guns
One of the big guns

Inside this circular structure were two iron-like doors which was either a storage site (highly unlikely) or a door leading to the tunnels (likely).  The teens whizzed around taking photos of flowers stopping now and then to look at some history.  This gave me the time to look around and just put pieces of the puzzle together of what this place would look like in full action.

You can find the Leighton Battery Heritage site along the Stirling Highway.  It is on the northern side of Fremantle with clear signage along this route.  Parking can be found on both sides of the hill.  Expect some walking.  If you are visiting in the Summer, take along water, hat and sunscreen.

Kids Rating:  6.5 out of 10.
What would make it a 10?  A tour!

The Basilica of St. Patrick’s ~ Fremantle

St. Patrick’s Basilica Fremantle can be found in the heart of Fremantle.  It is a Catholic Church hosting Mass everyday.

 

St Patrick's Church Fremantle
The irony I found with this setting is that Jesus, in the far corner, is surround by roses (also known for thorns). Jesus wore a crown a thorns to this death. I wonder if this setting was created because of the analogy it presents.

The church itself was established in the 1890’s mostly for Diocesan Priests. However in 1894, it was entrusted to the  Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate. And since the 1940, during the fishing era, many immigrants visited St. Patrick to give thanks for their safe journey.

 

St Patrick's Church Fremantle

The question I found myself asking was:  What is the Oblates?

According the history of the church:

In 1789 the Church in France suffered greatly as a consequence of the Revolution. Over 34,000 priests were either exiled or executed. More than half of the parishes were without priests to say Mass and administer the sacraments.

It was to answer this desolation of the Church that Eugene de Mazenod was called by Jesus to preach the Gospel. He became a Priest and began working among the poorest villages in the south of France. Soon other zealous priests joined him in his work. In 1816 de Mazenod established the group as a small religious community. In 1826 they were approved by the Pope and given the title Oblates of Mary Immaculate.

Architecturally, the church is amazing.  It reminds me the 13th century era when they used Gargoyles in many of their designs.  Of course, movies such as the Humpback of Notre Dame could make a very interesting conversation piece, especially when talking to kids about the exterior.

We arrived at the church during Mass.  Ironically, unlike many churches that are only open on Sunday (some Saturday and Sunday), this church is open everyday.  It was refreshing to see despite the couple of glares from the pews as I walked into the side entrance with camera in hand! #awkward

 

St Patrick's Church Fremantle
Fantastic Architecture that can spring a range of conversational topics with the kids.

Of course, I happened to make it to the church ‘on time’, and in respect of their mass I stayed on the outer perimeter.  I realized it was mass when I entered into the side entrance only to be greeted by a number of ‘unhappy’ glares.  Tracking back, and proceeded to the front entrance where I was able to capture a couple of window shots.  It was during communion time, and I was asked by one of the patrons if I would like to join the queue.  I politely declined as I knew that this honor is for Catholics, which did not include me.

Kids rating:  5 out of 10.
What would make it a 10?  Able to go inside the church (not during mass) and appreciate the design without the glares!

The Prison – Fremantle

The Fremantle Prison was built in the 19th century and continued to be used until 1991.

The Prison Entrance

The first convict transport sailed in 1850.  Convicts were a means to help build the colony and convicts built the ‘establishment’ between 1852 and 1859 using limestone quarried on site.

The Visitors Center

According to the Fremantle Prison archives ‘The Prison was a place of hangings, floggings, dramatic convict escapes and prisoner riots’  The prison saw a fluctuation of inmates throughout its time of use, which could also hold 1000 prisoners.  However, during the gold rush era, the prison was probably the busiest with many prisoners finding  their way to Rottnest Island.

Fremantle Prison
The Convict Depot

During World War II, the Defense Force used part of the prison to detain ‘enemy aliens’ which mostly comprised of Italians.  Later in 1983, due to a number of prison riots, the royal commission recommended its closure.  Almost a decade later it was closed and a year later it was leased to a private entity for public viewing.  This lasted for about 10 years before the government reclaimed the lease and in 2005, the Prison was listed on the heritage site.

Public Bathrooms

The Prison can be found on the outskirts of the Cappuccino Strip found in Fremantle.  There is plenty of parking with the first hour free, which means have a quick look-see can fit the budget.

A quick glance at the prices.

What you get to see for free?

You can see the Visitors Center (former contact area), Convict Depot (former Superintendents backyard), the Cafe (a newly added feature) and the shop.  For all other areas, there is a fee which can be pricey if you are on a shoestring budget.

Kid’s rating 7.5 out of 10
What would make it a 10?  One of the tours!

In conclusion, the day was rated average. However, given the limitations of what we could do for the day, it was very successful.  The kids learnt about a number of things on this trip, and saw things they have not seen yet.  Things I would do differently is to pack a picnic basket and enjoy a meal by the beach.  I normally do this, however this was a trip of impulse and we just decided to go with the flow!

 

The Disappearing Surfer

The thing about Cottoesloe and the coastal area around it, is the expanse of sculptures that present themselves in true ‘Perthonian’  form.  From experience, I have seen a range of sculptures decorate the coastline and most often, seem to change on an annual schedule. As a result, I hope that by the time you read this article, this sculpture will still be there.

It’s original name is called ‘Pause’ created by April Pine.  I initially saw a Surfing Silhouette standing looking at the sea.  Instinctively I thought ‘Cool, a surfer’.  But as we drove past, I noticed the figure disappear.  Notably – I had to stop.

Sculpture by the Sea surfer disappers scuplture

What stood before me was a very well designed sculpture made from metal sheets, that were places cleverly in perfect size and form, to give any visitor the impression it is a surfer looking at the sea.

It is only when you drive past that you will see the sculpture blend into the sea and horizon, as if the surfer disappears before your eyes.

Pause sculpture by the Sea

A sculpture like this is a must to ‘sea’. (pun intended)  To find this ‘Pause’ it is located on the Fremantle side of Cottoesloe.

If you missed it, then I hope these photos suffice!  However, on a final note – the artist, April Pine,  sells smaller versions of this sculpture.

How to Keep Kids Busy on a Road Trip

I designed the A-Z Australian Creature Feature List to keep kids busy while in the car. The goal is to see if kids can spot as many of the animals on the list as possible.  You could opt for a reward, or a prize, at the end of the journey

see-if-you-can-tick-off-3

 

To download the full size pdf just click on the image.  Don’t forget to like this post and subscribe if you want more cool things like this!  Happy travel! 😉

Clackline

I have passed this little town a number of times.  It really is one of those towns that if you blink, you will pass it.  However,  today I made a purposeful stop – because I was the master of my own destiny! 😉

clackline5

Situated about 40 minutes north east of Perth (along the Great Eastern Highway),  you will find Clackline just shy of Northam.

clackline4

It has one post office/convenient store, and according to data it is the only store to supply the community Clackline with necessary products/produce since 1890.

clackline3

There is a little walkway which will give you the opportunity to see the wildflowers  – if you are walking this trail during the right time of the year.

clackline7

While I did not have enough time to have a good “look-see”  the area I did see was not only beautiful but also structured with a little humor.  Yes – they do have their own HillyBilly Ridge.

clackline9

If you are traveling along the Great Eastern Highway towards Northam or from the Northam area to Perth – Clackline is well worth the stop and definitely a little off the beaten track!  Enjoy 😉

Read the next post (with pics) about longest water line in the world!

pie